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Author Topic: Current Events that do not Mention He Who Shall Not Be Named in any Way.  (Read 4778 times)

pnr

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We'd live in a different world if we could persuade our school and geographical communities to include each other, to reach out to others and acknowledge them, to serve and have empathy and gratitude, to celebrate not just the victory, but the effort and the persistence, and to do everything in their power to make sure that every child gets positive affirmation and hugs every single day.  The way to stop school shootings is to prevent children from the alienation that results in them.
Nauvoo 1270, Feb 2005
 
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Roper

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Public schools in the U.S. are based on a deficit model:  Require all students to take standardized tests, use those tests to identify students who are failing in one or more areas, plan and deliver "interventions" for them, then re-test.  No wonder kids feel alienated.
 

Curelom

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Here is a scary story, about a teenager who missed the school bus, knocked on a neighbor’s door to ask for directions, & was shot at by the resident. Looks like a racial profiling case; the kid is black & the residents are white.

https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/crime/a-teen-missed-the-bus-to-school-when-he-knocked-on-a-door-for-directions-a-man-shot-at-him/ar-AAvRkEh?ocid=spartanntp

However, I have another pressing question. How is it that halfway through the spring semester, a 14-yo does not know the way to his own school? Didn’t his parents train him to pay attention when he first started taking the bus, to learn the route or recognize street names or landmarks? This is just one more of many cases about young people not having the life skills to function at even the simplest level. ::)
 

Jason

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...However, I have another pressing question. How is it that halfway through the spring semester, a 14-yo does not know the way to his own school? Didn’t his parents train him to pay attention when he first started taking the bus, to learn the route or recognize street names or landmarks? This is just one more of many cases about young people not having the life skills to function at even the simplest level. ::)

Simplest levels are relative. I had to log into Netflix for my mother. Giving her the username and password was not enough. I had to highlight the ON button for my grandmother on a DVD player so that she could watch her Monk collection. She had only wistfully looked at the boxes for 6 months prior to my visit.
 

Palmon

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School buses do not go the most direct route to schools. If he has always taken the bus and never had to walk, he may not know the way - especially if it is a distance from his home. As for the possibility that his parents may have driven him there before, how many kids (and adults) pay attention when they are just passengers?
 
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Iggy

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School buses do not go the most direct route to schools. If he has always taken the bus and never had to walk, he may not know the way - especially if it is a distance from his home. As for the possibility that his parents may have driven him there before, how many kids (and adults) pay attention when they are just passengers?

I grew up in Ballard, a community within the Seattle city limits. I pretty much took the bus everywhere except school. Lived within walking distance of all three: Elementary, Jr. & High. BUT everything else was a bus or three away. I seldom paid attention to the route. I only looked up from reading a book often enough to catch the landmark of when to get off the buss.

When they bused the African American kids in to my high school from their community, most of those kids slept on the 1 hour bus ride, as did the kids from my high school who went to their school [the African American].
 

pnr

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Maybe he's homeless and was hanging with a buddy.   Maybe he didn't need directions but he was hoping for a ride and used that ruse (the fact that he didn't have any idea how these neighbors would react suggests he wasn't familiar with the neighborhood).
Nauvoo 1270, Feb 2005
 

Jacaré

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There's always more to these stories than what initially appears in the news, but the police reaction seems to indicate that they believe it to be legitimate. There's nothing in the article to suggest the boy is homeless, although I'm not sure what difference that makes. When a suspicious person knocked on my door, I closed the door and called the police. No need to go full Clint Eastwood. As for not knowing the neighborhood; as an adult I lived in the same house for almost 17 years and I couldn't have told you who the crazy people were on the next block.
"He was old, Ephraim. He was 52."
 

Curelom

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Yes, I suppose there could be many reasons why a 14-yo doesn’t know the way to school. It occurred to me afterward that he may have had a learning disability or something, but I don’t recall reading or hearing so in any of the news stories. I would think that parents with kids who ride a bus, walk, or cycle to school – anyone who goes back & forth without a parent or authorized adult – would train the kids to know the way, recognize streets, & identify some of the landmarks. Anything could happen & the kid might need that info for a variety of reasons.

I started walking to school along or with sib or nbr kids when I was maybe 9 (back in the day before everyone was afraid to let their kids out of view). Before that, we had a parent walk us, instruct us to take the same route each day so we would get to know it well (& so when we began going on our own, they would know where to look if we were overdue), & point out Mr. Davis’s grocery store (those were also the days when kids called all adults by a respectful title), the Chinese laundry, the house with the big black planter basket hanging in front. I hope young Mr. Walker’s folks have learned from this & will find out the bus route & trace it with him a time or two to spare the poor kid another similar ordeal.

Speaking of which - for Pete’s sake, the kid looks like a kid, a young student, not a hulking NFL linebacker. If the neighbors were alarmed, all they had to do was say “Sorry,” close the door, & call the cops.

I will be the first person to call out “minority” group career victims who make a life’s work of crying racism & discrimination every time something doesn’t please them, & I can do that cuz I is a “minority.” I quit taking Al Sharpton seriously ages ago. There are cases where people give police or neighbors legitimate cause for suspicion & race has nothing to do with it. If someone waves an unloaded gun or a lifelike fake with no fluorescent tip & gets shot, that tragedy was avoidable – by the brandisher, & I feel sorry for those they leave behind & for the police who must live with having shot someone. OTOH, I really think this case goes too far, & I would be afraid of neighbors whose first reaction to a knock on the door is to scream, grab a gun, & shoot. Partly for their possible knee-jerk prejudice, & partly because normal people don’t scream & shoot when someone knocks on the door.
 

pnr

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So a more complete report today says that he was walking to school and was way out of his neighborhood when he didn't know where to go from where he was.  He was shot at as he ran away, and the shooter has been arrested.
Nauvoo 1270, Feb 2005
 

dyany

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I live in a smallish Idaho town.  We have a Facebook group, and here's an synopsis of some of the conversations that occur there:
There's been some kids doorbell ditching lately.  Some late at night or rarely in the a.m.  The reactions have been about 20% "I'm getting a door camera and calling the cops," 20% "I bet it's those damn Californians," and about 40% "I have a gun and if they come here they're dead." 

It's DOORBELL DITCHING, people!  Annoying, yes.  Worthy of being murdered?  Not in the slightest!  What is with people? 

I want to move from here SO BADLY.
 

Roper

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I don't know where would be better, at least in that aspect.  Not in Utah or Texas, in my experience.  One of my colleague's husband is a police officer.  A few weeks ago, he responded to calls about a fight.  He was there in less than three minutes.  When he got there, two people were in a standoff with guns pointed at each other.  About a dozen bystanders had formed a semi-circle around them, AND THEY ALL HAD WEAPONS DRAWN.  The officer said it looked like a war zone waiting to happen.  He didn't get out of his car and immediately called for backup.  This was Payson, Utah. 

So, I dunno. Maybe Sweden?
 

Palmon

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 The situation that Roper described is one of the best arguments for gun control. What used to be resolved with a  fight are now are gun fights, which sometimes end in death and prison.

 When people are really angry, they aren't rational and in an instant can pull out their guns and shoot. In Roper's story, the people surrounding the two most likely thought they were being good citizens, with the intention stopping the confrontation. After all, isn't that how it works on TV, people pull guns on a person threatening to shoot and everyone is saved?  They think they they can do that. They are not thinking of the grief and burden they'd bear if they took a life or in this situation, the massacre that would have happened if someone actually fired.

By the way, I believe in the second amendment. I understand its purpose. But we live in such a fearful and sick society, that guns have become a real threat. The only real cure is to have strong families that teach respect for life, which is not likely to happen any time soon.
 
 
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Curelom

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I am a gun owner & retiree from law enforcement & public safety who believes in reasonable gun control, & I agree about that situation. With misguided, well-meaning people in a tense encounter, all it takes is one mistake or misunderstanding, one person panicking or losing control, & we could see several dead folks. If professionally trained police officers make mistakes, what makes average citizens believe they are qualified to enforce the law or respond to crime? I wouldn't have waded alone into a brawl in the women's jail, & I don't blame that officer one bit for standing back. 

One problem with the issue of gun rights/gun control is that both extremes see only their side. Too many gun control advocates do want to disarm everyone or enact unreasonable restrictions, & too many gun rights advocates do interpret the Second Amendment to mean any person in any condition with any kind of personal history should be able to have any kind of firearm. Neither of these is a reasonable opinion.

Not sure what the weapons were in Roper’s story. But even a .22 pea shooter can be lethal in a close encounter. If people want handguns for protection, or sporting arms for hunting or target shooting, I have no problem with that. I am not an extremist who wants to “disarm all law-abiding citizens.” But I also not an extremist who believes every law-abiding citizen needs or should have access to military-grade assault weapons that have no legitimate sporting or recreational use, or that widespread concealed carry is a good thing, or that a record of violence or mental disturbance shouldn’t be used to limit people’s access to guns.

As for any new gun control measures, I doubt how effective they’d be, with all the assault weapons floating around. No one is going to voluntarily give them up, especially to a government agency, since many extremists believe they will someday need their weapons to resist their own government or ward off an invasion of illegal immigrants or some such thing. Reasonable people have hoped that after Parkland & Sutherland Springs & Las Vegas & Orlando & Newtown & Virginia Tech & on & on & on, there would be more sentiment to control access to what really are WMDs. But in the highly confrontational, adversarial, hostile political & social atmosphere that is American public discourse today, there isn’t much space for reasonable people. And as long as those in Washington cultivate & fertilize that atmosphere & continue to turn Americans against Americans, there won’t be.
 

Roper

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I don't think taking away people's guns will ever work.  People have a right to bear arms. They purchased them legally (well, except for criminals.)

What we can do is make improvements going forward.  I think gun laws should mirror laws for operating a vehicle.

- Before you can operate a gun, you should have to obtain a license, which requires education.  You should have to pass a written and a performance test to prove that you know applicable laws and regulations, and that you can operate safely.

- Just as there are different levels of driver's licenses (CDLs, for instance,) there should be different levels for gun operation.

- You should have to carry insurance for operating a gun.

There are other considerations, such as operating under the influence, which can be worked out.
 
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