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cook

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Re: Distance Learning
« Reply #15 on: August 05, 2020, 09:58:24 am »
That's something similar to what I posted on my facebook, quite early on. Not only that because "everyone" tries to invent the covid vaccine and other important vaccinations are stopped because of it causing more deaths than covid, also there still are more people dying of hunger etc.

I get it, covid is real. It is a good idea to work to stop it. But all this is so western world oriented -death has come to our doorstep so we must act quickly and with great measures - and after this is done, again forget everyone else doing in vast amounts for reasons we actually could do something about.Why don't we gather the world experts the same way to deal with all the other issues killing people? Because those other things don't affect our everyday lives.

Call me a cynic or whatever, but it does kind of make me feel sick.
 
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dyany

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Re: Distance Learning
« Reply #16 on: August 06, 2020, 09:01:53 pm »
Palmon: that sort of thing hit home for me with this, because my January mammogram came back sketchy and I needed a followup, but it was scheduled for the March and of course cancelled. I wasn't able to get in until halfway through June. If it had been something aggressive, the delay would have decreased my chances of survival significantly.

 

Sparky

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Re: Distance Learning
« Reply #17 on: September 17, 2020, 04:38:36 am »
Now that I'm in the throes of in-school and distance-learning at the same time, all I can say is I'm exhausted! We are in the middle of week 3. In trying to please everyone, we have two thirds of the kids in school and one-third at home. I wish we'd either gone all in with everyone in school, or everyone at home. In my county, we are making "modules" for each week for each subject to teach our distance learners. These modules provide all of the lessons and resources needed for four days of instruction, with the fifth day meant for conferencing with the distance learners. Even splitting the work load up, and each teacher in a grade taking one subject, it's been difficult. I'm in charge of the fifth grade math for my school. I'm the gifted teacher and teach the advanced content math class for fifth graders, so it was logical for me to do the math. Others do the reading, writing, science, and social studies. I make four videos for each of four days: Intro to the week (just once), intro to the day, lesson for the day, practice explanation for the day, and number talk. That's sixteen videos for each week to be made prior to the following week's instruction. Then we Google Meet with our distance learners every day for a few minutes to double-check how they are doing, to explain things "in person," etc. So every lesson in school gets interrupted with the Meet. It's supposed to be when the in-school kids are doing their practice work, so supposedly the teacher is free, but kids need help! Even with setting my timer on my phone to tell me when to have the Meet, I managed to miss at least twice for each class that I teach during the first two weeks of school. This week, the Meets have been cut back to just twice a week, and so far I've gotten to all of them just fine. Kids can contact us at any time if they need help, and we'll get back to them as soon as we can.

It's like doing the same work twice. Make the videos for the kids at home, then teach the kids at school the same content the next week. Right now I'm two weeks ahead, but in just a few days that'll only be one week ahead. It's a constant push to get things done, using every possible spare moment during the day and then coming in an hour early and leaving two hours later than the "work hours."

I'm very happy to be teaching again, and to be working with the kids again. But it's an exhausting process. Whew! Just needed to share and update on how it's going!
 
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Roper

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Re: Distance Learning
« Reply #18 on: September 17, 2020, 03:12:42 pm »
Sparky, your process sounds remarkably similar to what we do at my school. Here's how I structured our schedule to help teachers with all the extra responsibilities: I put all our specialty classes on the same day for each grade level. For example, on Wednesdays, all the first grade classes rotate through art, music, Spanish, P.E., yoga, and recess. I hired part-time assistants to help the kids through all their rotations on that day. All the first-grade teachers have Wednesdays as their planning day--no instructional responsibility on their planning day. They can even work from home if they want. They use that day to create a week's worth of classroom lessons and online lessons. The added benefit is that for the specialty teachers, they only have one grade level--a cohort--coming through their classrooms on any one day. It helps to reduce virus transmission (according to our state recommendations, anyway.)

We're all still exhausted. I'm really hoping for a viable vaccine soon we can all get off this crazy train.
All grown-ups were once children...but only few of them remember it. ― Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, "The Little Prince."
 
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Sparky

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Re: Distance Learning
« Reply #19 on: September 17, 2020, 04:52:05 pm »
Roper, having that full day to plan sounds won.der.ful!!! Our principal has our Early Intervention Teachers taking charge of a class on Wednesdays so the homeroom teachers get an extra planning period that day. That's about all of the extra time they got. I'm not a homeroom teacher, and only have four planning periods a week instead of the regular five. It's just how it worked out with my schedule. I love to hear the things you are doing with your school. You sound like the kind of principal I wish I had!
 
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Roper

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Re: Distance Learning
« Reply #20 on: September 17, 2020, 07:17:14 pm »
The drawback is that on the other four days, teachers have no planning period. They get recess and lunch off, but it makes for long days with only those breaks. So far, though, the teachers are liking it.
All grown-ups were once children...but only few of them remember it. ― Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, "The Little Prince."
 
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Jason

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Re: Distance Learning
« Reply #21 on: November 15, 2020, 10:52:33 pm »
I still cannot imagine how people are managing distance learning without a parent at home. With my 5 year old distance learning somewhat resembles home schooling with someone else coming up with the lesson plans. They only have video classes for 30-120 minutes a day. Otherwise the parents direct them on the assignments. Since we have a stay at home parent who helps her stay focused and complete all of her assignments, she is doing as fine as can be expected. Those without a stay at home parent are at an big disadvantage. I foresee the typical affluence based achievement gaps widening dramatically.

But that could just be my pessimism about having Kindergarten from home. Has anyone seen any ways in which the really young students are doing better than they otherwise would have? Any improvements in teaching? Any signs of hope at all? Or will we spend years trying to rectify the gaps we are creating today?
 
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cook

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Re: Distance Learning
« Reply #22 on: November 15, 2020, 11:17:21 pm »
If it consoles at all, in Finland we start school the year kid turns 7 and they do just fine. So kindergarten not being for you what it has been before doesn't yet mean falling behind.

 
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Jana at Jade House

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Re: Distance Learning
« Reply #23 on: November 16, 2020, 05:53:05 am »
And here in the Netherlands students (where schools stay open til there is a case found in the school)  do not "fall behind"  they are simply given more time to learn. Repeating a year or even two up to the end of secondary education is not seen as a great failure.  so educationally not having classroom time is not particularly a crisis. However, the socialization!  we do not have school sports or school clubs or dances or graduation for that matter.. our kiddoes go to music school or sports unions and what have you outside of school.

Everything like that has been cut back drastically.  The bars and night clubs and restaurants where university students go to chill and recreate are closed.  Boy is hating the few hours a week he can use the lab, it is like a ghost town on campus.  He in fact is ready to throw his whole academic career out the window,  His depression is so profound I am worried.  But the waiting list for mental help is so long and  increases every day. 

I am afraid a whole generation will lose every hope and every dream and every passion they once had.  it is not just the virus, it is also the state of the world, the economics, the environmental crisis, and as Boy says what is there to live for? What is the point?

So now we see why faith is an anchor.
 
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pnr

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Re: Distance Learning
« Reply #24 on: November 16, 2020, 12:49:38 pm »
Nauvoo 1270, Feb 2005
 
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Roper

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Re: Distance Learning
« Reply #25 on: November 16, 2020, 01:53:34 pm »
Jana, your poor boy can't seem to catch a break. First the problems with the house, and now this. I remember when our families met in real Nauvoo many years ago. Your boy was teaching me how to correctly pronounce your last name in Dutch. I wasn't getting it right, so he patiently insisted I keep trying until I produced something reasonably close. It must be excruciating--to have that tendency toward completing things correctly and then to have everything constantly in turmoil with no real resolution. I'll keep your family in my prayers. I hope things improve soon.
All grown-ups were once children...but only few of them remember it. ― Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, "The Little Prince."
 
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dyany

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Re: Distance Learning
« Reply #26 on: November 16, 2020, 03:59:02 pm »
I think the biggest disservice we've given to the young people is teaching them the idea that perfection or completeness is possible in this life, and that failure is bad and should be voraciously avoided.
The fact is that failures and shortfalls and imperfections are not only okay, they are the purpose of this life. The purpose wasn't just to give us bodies. Heavenly Father knew that we needed to experience hard things and imperfections and a fallen world and bodies to have any chance of attaining full perfection and eternal life. That's why the full plan (not just having bodies) was necessary, and why we needed the veil. The idea that we can 'have it all' and have great lives is delusional and sets us up for despair.
I'm not saying that we should necessarily seek failure, but putting ourselves in the position where failure is possible is the only place where the growth occurs.
 
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Palmon

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Re: Distance Learning
« Reply #27 on: November 16, 2020, 06:41:08 pm »
Coincidentally, I read this quote this morning:
Kurt Vonnegut:
“When I was 15, I spent a month working on an archeological dig.  I was talking to one of the archeologists one day during our lunch break and he asked those kinds of “getting to know you” questions you ask young people: Do you play sports?  What’s your favorite subject?   And I told him, no I don’t play any sports.  I do theater, I’m in choir, I play the violin and piano, I used to take art classes.
And he went WOW.  That’s amazing!  And I said, “Oh no, but I’m not any good at ANY of them.”
And he said something then that I will never forget and which absolutely blew my mind because no one had ever said anything like it to me before: “I don’t think being good at things is the point of doing them.  I think you’ve got all these wonderful experiences with different skills, and that all teaches you things and makes you an interesting person, no matter how well you do them.”
And that honestly changed my life.  Because I went from a failure, someone who hadn’t been talented enough at anything to excel, to someone who did things because I enjoyed them.  I had been raised in such an achievement-oriented environment, so inundated with the myth of Talent, that I thought it was only worth doing things if you could “Win” at them.”
 
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AndrewR

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Re: Distance Learning
« Reply #28 on: November 17, 2020, 06:00:21 am »
Life is an experience. It was always meant to be. Sure, it's an experience with a desired outcome (or set of outcomes). The more we experience, within the confines of the commandments and covenants we have been given, the better.

It helps to be good at things. But you don't have to be perfect. I make mistakes when I play the organ or piano. Very few, especially the untrained, ever know. If it is part of prelude music I often disguise the mistake by switching a key up or down, or playing in the minor key. Or I add an ad lib. I'm not very good at any of those, but I can do them, and no one can tell if I am being clever, or making a mistake.

No one would ever pay to come and hear me play - not even my parents.
Don't ask me, I only live here.
Nauvoodle since March 2005 #1412
 
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Scruffydog

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Re: Distance Learning
« Reply #29 on: November 18, 2020, 08:06:55 am »
See? If you want words of wisdom, talk to an archaeologist. You're welcome  8)
 
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