New Nauvoo Forum

Arts, Entertainment, and Culture => Literature & Poetry => Topic started by: Roper on April 14, 2017, 09:30:27 pm

Title: What are you reading?
Post by: Roper on April 14, 2017, 09:30:27 pm
I thought we could use a literary thread in the spirit of "What are you watching?"

I'll go first.

I'm reading American Public School Law for one of my classes.  It contains a fascinating study of the Supreme Court cases which have shaped school law.

Right now, the most interesting case to me is Morse v. Frederick, 2007: High school students were released from school to watch the Olympic torch parade. One student, Frederick, crossed the street (therefore not on school property) and held up a banner which read, "Bong hits 4 Jesus."  Morse, the principal, ordered Frederick to take down the banner. When Frederick refused, Morse suspended Frederick for 10 days. Frederick sued, claiming that his first amendment right of free speech had been violated.  The Ninth Circuit Court agreed, and held that the principal had violated Frederick's right to free speech. In a 5-4 decision, SCOTUS overturned the lower court's ruling and sided with Morse, ruling that the school may regulate student speech which is antithetical to the school's anti-drug message.

While I don't condone Frederick's actions on moral grounds, I believe the SCOTUS legal decision was wrong. Students, as citizens, don't shed their constitutional rights when they pass the schoolhouse gates. The decision gives enormous police power to the school. However, educators are neither commissioned nor trained to be law enforcement officers. Furthermore, Frederick's stunt was on public grounds (not at the school) and was intended to attract media attention. No reasonable person would construe that Frederick was an agent of the school who was promoting drug use.  He was a kid hoping to get on TV.

Anyway, I would have thought the 1100 page legal tome to be a total snooze fest. Much of it is, so I do a lot of scanning.  However, there are some cases which really merit careful study and consideration. 
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: CrowGirl on April 15, 2017, 01:01:02 am
When the Westboro Baptist people came to protest in Tampa (2009? 2010?), they chose to do it across from one of the high schools on the peninsula.  CrowSon was planning to join the counterprotest, when word came down from the District Powers-that-Be that any and all students doing so would be suspended.  It was the same thing--school district dictating and enforcing behavior not on school property.  I decided it wasn't worth some potential lawsuit--CrowSon was trying to get into college at the time, plus the Air Force wouldn't have let us stick around to see one through--so I praised him greatly for his intent, but said Leave It Alone.  So this case's outcome does not surprise me. 

I vaguely remember the incident behind Morse v. Frederick.  Thanks for the outcome.

On topic, I am reading The Cold Dish, the first book in the Longmire series.  A lot of differences between this and the A&E/Netflix series, but I'm enjoying it very much. 

CrowMan just finished--and wants me to read--Mindset: The New Psychology of Success by Carol S. Dweck, Ph.D.  He says it will help him be a better teacher, and parent.  I'll write more after I've read it, but if anyone else has, I'd like to read their thoughts.
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: dyany on April 15, 2017, 03:10:20 pm
This is the hardest thing for me.  I used to LIVE to read.  I read ALL THE TIME.  I was defined by many people as the person who never stopped reading.  But one of the things the depression stole from me is my ability to comfortably read.  As in, I often get anxiety when approaching a book, feel guilt for spending time on it, and find myself unconsciously avoiding reading.  It breaks my heart.  I get maybe 5 books read per year these days, when it used to probably be closer to 100. 
That being said, I have been able to finish a few books, and I'm finding that listening to Audible while I am a the gym or driving all over creation for work has been pretty helpful.
Last series I loved: The Lunar Chronicles (starting with Cinder) by Marissa Meyer, and the Reckoners (Steelheart, et al) by Brandon Sanderson.
Last standalone book I really loved: The Accidental Highwayman: Being the Tale of Kit Bristol, His Horse Midnight, a Mystery Princess, and Sundry Magical Persons Besides by Ben Tripp
Fiction currently Reading/listening to: Guards! Guards! by Terry Pratchett.  Oh my goodness the non-stop funny is SO helpful for my anxiety!
Non-fiction currently listening to: Medieval Heroines in History and Legend, a college course offered by The Great Courses through Audible.

Stuff I read semi-recently that I can't really recommend: Uprooted by Naomi Novik.  It really pulled me in and felt nice and YA, then 3/4 of the way it had a horrifically graphic 2 page sex scene.  I skipped that part, but I felt betrayed and tricked.  The ending wasn't very satisfactory, either.  It didn't wrap things up well and was very meandering.

Stuff I haven't been able to finish yet: The Goose Girl by Shannon Hale.  It's been building up to the big bad event, and I am pretty sure I know what's going to happen and it makes me so upset that I had to set it aside.  I don't know if I will be able to pick it back up again.
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: Susan on May 05, 2017, 01:47:13 pm
I don't know why I stopped reading because I love it....maybe finding Netflix could be part of the reason.   I have a goal of reading at least 40 books this year and frankly I am a little behind but plan to catch up.  This year I have read:  The Life We Bury, The Shipping News, The Glass Castle, Snow Child and In the Blood. 
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: kazbert on May 06, 2017, 08:54:44 am
"Science Fiction and Philosophy: From Time Travel to Superintelligence"
by Susan Schneider

A bit chewy in places, but fascinating to me just how thoroughly (broadly and deeply) most sci-fi concepts have been examined by hundreds of authors over the years. 

I've been doing a lot of sci-fi writing lately involving AI, and I found this book saved me from having to devote a lot of time thrashing around aimlessly investigating concepts that were new to me, and also gave me some great concepts to integrate into my story. 
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: Scruffydog on May 06, 2017, 09:28:22 am
Just read the Odd Thomas series from Dean Koontz. Quite interesting, and enjoyable because Koontz is a Catholic with a clear idea of good and evil. No fruity bits, and I found the character of Odd Thomas very engaging.
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: Roper on May 06, 2017, 11:38:48 am
I really like Dean Koontz.  I've read many of his earlier books.  I haven't started the Odd Thomas series.  Thanks for the good report.  I'll have to put them on my summer reading list.

Koontz wrote "Oddkins." It's one of my favorite books for children, precisely because the good characters embody good principles, such as loyalty and friendship.  While the characters have misgivings and are often hesitant about their own capabilities, they press forward in doing the right thing even though they're scared.  It's ultimately a story about faith. There are no ambiguous heroes in the story, such as somewhat good characters with dark and troubled back stories.  Good is good and evil is evil. It's a great book for kids (and grownups, too.)  Plus, if you can still find the illustrated version, Phil Parks' full color illustrations bring visually vibrant life to the toy characters.
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: Redd on May 06, 2017, 11:45:16 am
My son just gave us the second Rick Riordan book The Trials of Apollo.  I am not sure I appreciate the same sex attraction he weaves into some of his books but at least he is tactful about it.


I read the books out loud to my husband and the people I visit at the nursing homes.   I have enjoyed all of his mythological based books except the Kane Chronicles based on Egyptian mythology, I just find the Egyptian mythology hard to follow (and the books just do not read out loud well.)
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: dyany on May 06, 2017, 03:53:29 pm
I really love the Odd Thomas series.  I couldn't get through the last few books because of the anxiety, so I had to have my husband paraphrase them for me because I needed to know what happened!
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: Scruffydog on May 11, 2017, 03:11:07 pm
I was a bit disappointed with some of Koontz's other books, but the Odd Thomas books are good. I have run out of fiction to read, which is a pain, but I need to get back to work reading
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: Palmon on May 18, 2019, 03:43:22 pm
How about resurrecting this thread and posting the names of books you've read and recommend?

I've seen a couple of writeups about this book, Plague by Gregg Luke. It's going into my E-book stash now.
https://www.amazon.com/Plague-Gregg-Luke-ebook/dp/B07P6ZCSBX/ref=sr_1_3?crid=RZ195WLUF3LR&keywords=gregg+luke&qid=1558208504&s=digital-text&sprefix=gregg+luke%2Caps%2C194&sr=1-3 (https://www.amazon.com/Plague-Gregg-Luke-ebook/dp/B07P6ZCSBX/ref=sr_1_3?crid=RZ195WLUF3LR&keywords=gregg+luke&qid=1558208504&s=digital-text&sprefix=gregg+luke%2Caps%2C194&sr=1-3)
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: Roper on May 18, 2019, 10:29:38 pm
One more week and then school's out for summer. For the past nine months, I've only read professional development books and children's literature. I'm looking forward to reading just for pleasure. Thank you, everyone, for your recommendations.
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: N3uroTypical on May 18, 2019, 10:40:35 pm
They are making a new Dune movie - the actor who played Thanos and the actor who played Aquaman are off in Budapest filming it.  So I'm re-re-rereading every Dune book I can get my hands on.

Just won an ebay auction:
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: Roper on May 19, 2019, 12:04:54 am
They are making a new Dune movie - the actor who played Thanos and the actor who played Aquaman are off in Budapest filming it. 
You mean Sting won't be in this one?  ;)
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: dyany on May 19, 2019, 02:45:35 am
Gregg Luke, huh? I kind of know him...we run in the same writing circles and I saw him a few times at the writing conference I was at last weekend.

As to books....I'm listening to Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine right now and just loving it.  It is very rare for me to get sucked into books these days, but this one succeeded!
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: LMAshton on May 19, 2019, 04:47:55 am
Well... I'm reading Enid Blyton... In French and Spanish. I'm not sure this really helps anyone else, though... LOL!
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: Palmon on May 20, 2019, 06:05:12 pm
I had to look up Enid Blyton. 763 books and 600 million copies sold! All I can say is wow!
Are you reading her books to help with your Spanish and French? One of our sons did that on his mission to learn Russian.
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: Roper on May 20, 2019, 11:12:29 pm
After hearing NPR's interview with Senator Tom Cotton (R, Arkansas), I really want to read his book, "Sacred Duty: A Soldier's Tour at Arlington National Cemetery." It's about the U.S. Army's "Old Guard." That's the unit which provides ceremonial services, such as sentinel duty at the Tomb of the Unknowns and military burials, in Arlington National Cemetery. The Old Guard is the oldest active duty unit in our military, serving since 1784.
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: LMAshton on May 22, 2019, 01:13:50 am
I had to look up Enid Blyton. 763 books and 600 million copies sold! All I can say is wow!
Are you reading her books to help with your Spanish and French? One of our sons did that on his mission to learn Russian.

That's exactly what I'm using her books for. They're simple enough that I can understand most of it. I'm slow, but that's how it goes.

We're also reading comics in French - our favourites are Ana Ana and Pico Bogue. They're Calvin & Hobbes-esque. They're hilarious and entertaining and the artwork is beautiful.
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: N3uroTypical on May 22, 2019, 10:46:22 am
It's about the U.S. Army's "Old Guard." That's the unit which provides ceremonial services, such as sentinel duty at the Tomb of the Unknowns and military burials, in Arlington National Cemetery. The Old Guard is the oldest active duty unit in our military, serving since 1784.
I heard an interview with one of the members of that unit.  Very inspiring, weighty and sobering most of the time, very funny here and there.
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: Iggy on May 22, 2019, 01:19:12 pm
"The Host" by Stephanie Meyer.  Just recently joined a book club through my RS. I had read this book shortly after it was released. Had already ready her vampire books. Yeah, I am a senior adult, reading about vampires but I also read about paranormal stories, shape-shifters, werewolves and other creatures/monsters, etc. Actually I have been reading about them since I have been working and had my own money to buy the books - that would be when I was 17 (1969).

Am having a difficult time reading it. Just when I get settled into my recliner, glass of water close at hand, pillows propped behind my head and under the heavy hard backed book, Hubby either turns the volume on so the *room* aka me can hear it, or starts searching for a movie for us aka me - n - him to watch. If he would actually turn his head 45 degrees to the right and LOOK at me, he would see me settled in with a  - - -drum roll here - - - BOOK!

It is too uncomfortable to sit at my desk where my computer is to read a book, and I have never been able to read in bed. The dining room table is out too, because then the book is too high to comfortably read it.

Because it is a hard back, and a large one at that, I won't haul it around with me when I eat out alone. Only will take paperbacks that fit in my purse.

If I could just be left alone from after dinner to bedtime (approx. 3.5 hours) then I will easily finish this book in time for our meet-up with the book club. 
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: Taalcon on May 22, 2019, 03:46:06 pm
I read that! My take away was there was actually some really interesting ideas in there that I still think about. I can't sum up the story any more, but ideas that drove the story stuck!

Meanwhile, I'm working my way through the audiobook of Words of Radiance, Book 2 in Brandon Sanderson's Stormlight Archive.
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: Curelom on May 22, 2019, 11:41:56 pm
“Coast of Dreams” by the late Kevin Starr, an eminent California historian – IOW, a person from California who studied & wrote about California. He was also head of public libraries in both S.F. & L.A. & a college history professor. He had a strong interest in cultural history that shows in the many books he wrote about California. This one is about the millennial cusp years, 1990-2003, a time when more than a few Californians asked profound questions about what direction the state was really taking. Was it a true trend setter? Was it a failed (or failing) social & cultural experiment? The table of contents suggests some of the ways he approached the story of California in the years after Loma Prieta and before Prop 8: Surf’s Up!, Zen California, Catastrophe, Reefer Madness, Diversity, Endangered Species, Dot-Com Debacle.

I recently got “Small Wonder,” a collection of essays written by Barbara Kingsolver after 9/11. It’s supposed to be her thoughts on a variety of social, environmental, & moral issues in the changed perspective after 9/11, & I don’t know why it never came to my attention before. I haven’t started it yet, & since it is essays, I may not read it all at once. But just thinking about 9/11 & the immediate aftermath almost makes me nostalgic. Not for the awful events of that day, of course, but for the kind of national unity that we experienced for just a short time with a President who took his role as the leader of our country seriously. Regardless of anyone’s opinions on the events of 9/11 & America’s response in the years since, I’m grateful we had a POTUS who was capable of responding.
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: palmetto_gal on May 23, 2019, 01:02:37 am


Umm, Iggy, why not tell Bro. Iggy what you just told us? 
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: Iggy on May 23, 2019, 10:49:12 am
Umm, Iggy, why not tell Bro. Iggy what you just told us?

I did. Each time I started to get settled into my chair I told him. Just like I do when I want to nap in my chair rather than go to bed for a nap. He doesn't actually listen or perhaps he doesn't care to listen.

I even take out my hearing aids, tell him I am NOT wearing my ears so please keep the volume set only for him (through his hearing aids). I may as well be talking to the blasted wall!

But I am able to nap with the volume on and him chattering away. Just close my eyes and off to nap land I go.

I have a glider rocking chair in my bedroom - and a small folding step stool that works great as a foot rest, just have to put a cushion/pillow on it. So that is where I will be going to read from now on.
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: Roper on May 23, 2019, 10:27:43 pm
"The Host" by Stephanie Meyer.
I liked "The Host" much better than the Twilight series. My favorite part is when Wanda's telling the stories of her other lives on different worlds. My favorite character is Uncle Jeb. "My house. My rules."
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: AndrewR on July 23, 2019, 11:50:45 am
Has anyone ever read books by Theresa Sneed? Worth reading?
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: Palmon on August 23, 2019, 12:45:57 pm
Andrew, did you read any Theresa Sneed's books? What did you think of them?
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: dyany on August 23, 2019, 01:20:17 pm
I'm reading Thunderhead, the 2nd book in the Arc of the Scythe series by Neal Shusterman.  SO GOOD.  I haven't been this engaged in a book, let alone a series, in quite a while!  The 3rd comes out in November, in case anyone wants to read them but is a "I don't like to read a series until they are all out" type person.
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: Palmon on August 23, 2019, 10:34:07 pm
The reviews for that series are really good. It seems really dark and I suppose the YA target does like dark themes. But I have a problem with books where teenagers are trained to be killers - it's why the Hunger Games turned me off.

Dyany, what about the series has grabbed you?
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: AndrewR on August 24, 2019, 06:21:50 am
Palmon,

I have not read of her books as yet. I have been re-reading the Dune series. I read it in my mid teens and that was nearly 40 years ago. Having read the first book of your husband's new series I got the entire Dune set very cheap of Amazon. Hopefully the second book of Gary's will not be too long to wait for.
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: Palmon on August 24, 2019, 10:28:03 am
Thanks, Andrew. I'll pass that on to him.

I read Dune about then, too.
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: dyany on August 24, 2019, 12:05:54 pm
It is actually less cruelly violent and not really dystopian at all, unlike the Hunger Games series.  It is primarily the philosophical approach to what makes life life, and how death and mortality may have purpose outside of just capping usage of finite earthly resources. 

The premise is, rather than the ubiquitous dystopian future so popular in YA, an idyllic future where once an AI gains sentience and becomes all-powerful, it perfects efficiency and use of resources on earth and eliminates death and most suffering.  This has been going on long enough by the time the story starts that no one really remembers what it was like to have a fear of death or illness or anything like that.  The Scythedom developed as a special group that was supposed to be picked and trained to be supremely moral, so that humans, rather than the AI (the 'Thunderhead'), were the only ones to deliver the minimal deaths that are necessary to keep the population at a sustainable level. 

The level-headed approach to the deep philosophical and even political and spiritual questions in a practical milieu is excellent so far.  I love it.
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: Roper on August 24, 2019, 01:37:05 pm
I'm reading "Teaching with Fire." Teachers submitted poems which inspire them. The editors collected those poems, along with the teachers' stories, and published them in one volume. Here's one about how vital it is to celebrate children's accomplishments. I shared this with my colleagues this past week.

Fueled

Fueled
by a million
man-made
wings of fire
the rocket tore a tunnel
through the sky
and everybody cheered.
Fueled
only by a thought from God
the seedling
urged its way
through thicknesses of black
and as it pierced
the heavy ceiling of the soil
and launched itself
up into outer space
no
one
even
clapped.

--Marcie Hans
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: Palmon on August 25, 2019, 04:56:06 pm
Dyany, thanks for that writeup about Arc of the Scythe.  I am much more likely to read it now. Would you please post that as a review on Amazon? Other readers (like me) would really appreciate it!
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: dyany on August 27, 2019, 10:45:16 am
Took me a few days, but I posted the review!
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: Scruffydog on September 12, 2019, 03:45:41 am
Stella Gemmell's The City and The Immortal Throne. Both pretty good. Also a pile of Masters dissertations because I have to. All not as good as Stella Gemmell
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: Roper on December 14, 2019, 07:17:40 pm
One of my sons is an avid reader of all things Brandon Sanderson. Ben has been trying to get my wife and I to read something by Sanderson for the last few years. So, for one of our Christmas gifts to Ben, Michelle and I started reading "Elantris." I was pretty hesitant, but it got a really good review from Orson Scott Card, and I've liked everything I've read by Card, except for a couple of his short stories in "Maps in a Mirror." "Freeway Games"--ick. But, I digress. So...Elantris. The first chapter has me intrigued. More thoughts to come...
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: dyany on December 14, 2019, 08:48:40 pm
Elantris is good.
The Reckoners (YA sci-fi) is amazing.
The Stormlight Archive (epic fantasy) is amazing.  And the spiritual lessons I'm getting from it are PROFOUND.
Alcatraz vs the Evil Librarians (MG contemporary fantasy) is hilarious and excellent.
I've also heard excellent things about the Mistborn series, The Rithmatist, and the newer Skyward series.

He's pretty much my family's favorite author.  He's also smart and nice (I've met him a few times) and I'm fairly good friends with one of his regular beta readers, with whom I was talking extensively yesterday about the Stormlight Archive. That was hard, because I know she's read the 4th Stormlight book (which won't be officially released until next November), and she knew I knew, and both of us knew I didn't want to know, but that I kind of did. So we had to just fangirl for a bit. :)
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: Patty Rain on December 15, 2019, 09:47:31 am
Total fluff, but I have been listening to Sarah Eden's  books on the Deseret Book app. They are clean and require no thinking which helps me to relax my brain for awhile.
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: palmetto_gal on December 16, 2019, 09:12:13 am
Sometimes total fluff is just the right thing.  I've mentioned before that I listen to audio books while I work.  I'm alone in the evenings, my wing of the hospital is virtually empty.  I've listened to myriad audio books from the Deseret App.  I have to say it's the best bargain I've found.  Unlimited audio books for about $15 per month.  Knowing that none of the content is unobjectionable in terms of language, romance, etc., makes it a total winner for me. 

I've listened to books written by Prophets, Apostles, CES leaders, Auxiliary Leaders and (as above) clean fiction writers.  Someone please refresh my memory:  how is Tracy Hunter Abramson (LDS author) related to our dear departed Raro?  I enjoy her books, also.
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: AndrewR on December 16, 2019, 10:46:02 am
Mistborn is great, every last book of it.

Sanderson is a great writer.
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: dyany on December 16, 2019, 09:49:07 pm
Quote
how is Tracy Hunter Abramson (LDS author) related to our dear departed Raro?  I enjoy her books, also.

Traci lives in Virginia where our dear Raro lived. They were very close friends, and Traci credits Raro with starting her on writing. Traci took in Raro's minor children after she died.
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: CrowGirl on January 13, 2020, 07:24:07 pm
I finished Twelve Patients:  Life and Death at Bellevue Hospital by Dr Eric Manheimer.  An intriguing look into America’s oldest public hospital and some of the patients he has seen or interacted with.  One of the twelve was the good doctor himself.  He threw his political beliefs in here and there that I didn’t agree with, but understood where he was coming from.  He never got too technical.  I found I really didn’t know how chemotherapy was administered, and the description terrified me.  My hat goes off and I salute those that feel this is what they need to do; that is a courage I hope I never have to find if I possess.
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: palmetto_gal on January 15, 2020, 11:11:12 am
CrowGirl, thanks for the post above.  I've been watching New Amsterdam since its inception on TV.  It's based on Twelve Patients.  I just downloaded the audible version to listen to at work when I'm alone in the evenings.
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: Taalcon on January 15, 2020, 11:14:19 am
Finally decided to read Little Women, having neither read it or watched any filmed adaptation. And I'm finding it simply delightful.
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: Patty Rain on January 15, 2020, 08:23:50 pm
Quote
how is Tracy Hunter Abramson (LDS author) related to our dear departed Raro?  I enjoy her books, also.

Traci lives in Virginia where our dear Raro lived. They were very close friends, and Traci credits Raro with starting her on writing. Traci took in Raro's minor children after she died.

I did not realize that.  Thanks for letting us know.  Do you know how her kids are doing now?
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: Patty Rain on January 15, 2020, 08:53:53 pm
I'm in the middle of 4 books right now.

I'm reading The Compund Effect (https://www.amazon.com/Compound-Effect-Darren-Hardy/dp/1982648023).  So far it talks about changing your life by little things.  That over time they become greater.  Like cutting out 100 calories per day over time means a weight loss of 30 pounds.  I'm reading a little of this each night before bed.

Rex and I are listening to The Power of Stillness: Mindful Living for Latter-Day Saints (https://deseretbook.com/p/power-of-stillness-mindful-living-for-latter-day-saints-ppr?variant_id=176725-paperback) on Sundays, a chapter each week. 

I started to feel like I need to have more stillness in my life and this came at the right time.  After listening to about 4 or 5 chapters I thought I would like to listen to it with Rex and discuss the ideas.  So we are.

I have been walking at least 10,000 steps a day and sometimes I listen to music, sometimes nothing and sometimes a book.  After reading some of The Compound Effect I decided that for at least 1000 of those steps I would listen to something that will be helpful.  So I got on the Deseret Book app and am now listening to Willpower Is Not Enough: Why We Don't Succeed at Change (https://deseretbook.com/p/willpower-not-enough-why-we-dont-succeed-change-dean-byrd-1722?variant_id=110832-paperback) during that time. 

It's interesting being in the middle of the 3 books and just trying to be "still" to see what Heavenly Father says about the differences and where I fit in it all. I'm really liking this.

Last I am reading  The Power of Stillness: Mindful Living for Latter-Day Saints (https://deseretbook.com/p/power-of-stillness-mindful-living-for-latter-day-saints-ppr?variant_id=176725-paperback) or rather listening to it while I walk or do house work or drive or whatever.  It is my for fun book.  If you live in Salt Lake County it is one of the Reader's Choice  library books. 

I've never actively read or listened to so many books at one time before, but I'm enjoying it.  A couple of weeks ago I was listening to one book from Deseret Book that was set in England and had Dukes and Viscounts etc in it while in the car or walking and then one of my library books came off hold at the same and I would either read it or have Alexa read it to me at home.  It had the same type of setting.  Now those two were difficult to read together because there were so many Dukes, Lords, Viscounts etc between the 2 I would mix the two books up! 
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: dyany on January 15, 2020, 10:01:06 pm
Patty, from what I have seen they are doing well. I am friends with Traci on Facebook, and have talked to her a few times, but we're not really close by any means, but if people would like, I could ask her for an update on Raro's children for her old Nauvoodle friends. Doesn't hurt to ask.
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: Patty Rain on January 16, 2020, 03:18:26 pm
Patty, from what I have seen they are doing well. I am friends with Traci on Facebook, and have talked to her a few times, but we're not really close by any means, but if people would like, I could ask her for an update on Raro's children for her old Nauvoodle friends. Doesn't hurt to ask.

Please do.
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: dyany on January 16, 2020, 09:57:11 pm
I got a response from Traci. It's big enough (and not related to books enough :) ) that I'm going to put it in General Discussions.
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: palmetto_gal on January 18, 2020, 09:51:10 am
I attempted to listen to The Power of Stillness at work a couple of weeks ago.  It became quickly apparent that I had chosen the wrong setting in which to listen to it.  I will start over with it, at home, in peace and solitude where I can completely concentrate on the book. 
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: mirkwood on February 07, 2020, 11:36:08 am
I'm reading The Empire of Man series and Surprise, Kill, Vanish: The Secret History of CIA Paramilitary Armies, Operators, and Assassins.
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: AndrewR on February 07, 2020, 12:02:33 pm
Quote
'Jacobsen here presents a tour de force exploring the CIA's paramilitary activities...this excellent work feels like uncovering the tip of the iceberg ...Highly recommended for those seeking a better understanding of American foreign policy in action' Jacob Sherman, Library Journal

'A behind-the-scenes look at the most shadowy corners of the American intelligence community...Well-sourced and well-paced, this book is full of surprises' Kirkus

Wow - a real page turner. Something for everyone.  ;D
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: Roper on February 07, 2020, 01:11:57 pm
I'm reading "Wonder" aloud to a group of students. We just got to the part where Daisy, the family dog, dies. Holy cow, that's a hard part to get through.

If you haven't read "Wonder," make some time to read it. Your understanding of kids with disabilities will change in a hugely positive way.
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: pnr on February 08, 2020, 01:56:12 pm
Just finished "Live Undercover" by Amarylis Fox.   It was a really interesting read on what it is like to work for the CIA.
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: CrowGirl on February 09, 2020, 02:06:26 am
I’m having a hard time focusing on books, but the last library book I was working on was Saving Mona Lisa; a look at how the Louvre weathered the storms of war and tried to protect its artwork during WWII, of which the painting we know as Mona Lisa was one.

From my own library, I’m still working through the Longmire novels, and am on As the Crow Flies.  There is a lightheartedness to the books that does not come across in the TV series.  There have been moments in these books (and the short story collection) that cause me to laugh out loud at his wit.  I’ve read short stories aloud to CrowMan (sanitizing Vic’s salty language), to his enjoyment, as well.
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: cook on February 09, 2020, 12:30:09 pm
I second Roper's words on Wonder. Read it to my previous special education class a few years back, when thet were about 11. They loved it. It should be a must read to everyone.
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: dyany on February 09, 2020, 01:41:30 pm
Wonder, from what I have heard, should be read, and skip the movie. But if you really, REALLY want to understand disability well, here is an amazing tweet thread from a disabled MG author about tropes we need to avoid and why. It's not only good for writers, but excellent for EVERYONE to help them understand the biases and such that we have but don't even question or recognize, because they've been so ubiquitous in our (generally media generated) experience: https://twitter.com/beingcindy/status/1222216179873271809 (https://twitter.com/beingcindy/status/1222216179873271809)

I am currently reading The Toll, the 3rd in the Scythe books by Neal Shusterman. It's taking me forever because I hate the antagonist more than I've hated almost anything my entire life (imagine Dolores Umbridge times a thousand, with a lot of power), so I end up screaming, closing the audiobook, and avoiding it for a day or two at a time.

Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: Scruffydog on February 12, 2020, 03:51:32 am
I'm reading student essays and PoW memoirs. My brain hurts
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: CrowGirl on February 12, 2020, 09:51:30 am
 :o :P ;D
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: AndrewR on February 12, 2020, 10:53:29 am
Just finished the original six books of the Duna saga by Frank Herbert.

Just got the final two of that saga written by his son Brian and Kevin J Anderson.

Hopefully they are written as well as the first six were.
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: TurkeyLurker on February 12, 2020, 11:32:58 am
Daybreak:  2050 AD by Andrea Norton

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000K1WWAA/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_image_o05_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

It's a pulp fiction, post-apocalyptic sci-fi novel.  Very fun.  I'm pretty surprised that a female author can write a male-buddy-warriors tale so wonderfully.  She's getting the "hero's journey" trope down pretty solidly.

It's a really old book.  Funny-ish story about why I am reading this book:

I've wanted to read this since I was 11, but couldn't find it.  And then forgot about it for a VERY long time. And then I somehow remembered it a few weeks ago.  Thank you, Amazon.  My very favorite elementary school teacher would read to us (in 6th grade).  Even then, I LOVED sci-fi.  And we got to vote on the books he'd read to us.  I wanted him to read this to us, but everyone else in my farm-boy, small town class, just had to vote for some "stupid" book called "Rifles for Waite."  And then we never came back to this book, because it was the end of the year.

As it turns out, "Rifles for Waite" was kind of a fun civil war tale that I actually liked, once I got over being mad about it.  LOL

As soon as I finish this book, I'll probably try to find "Rifles for Waite."  Or maybe I'll read "Saints" volume 2.  Although I kind of am thinking about re-reading volume 1 of saints to be better prepared for the April conference commemorating the restoration.
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: JLM on February 12, 2020, 12:21:38 pm
Andrew, FYI, the last two sequel books by Brian Herbert will make no sense unless you read the Butlierisn Jihad prequel series first.  It also helps to read the three "House" prequel books as well. 
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: AndrewR on February 12, 2020, 12:59:06 pm
Andrew, FYI, the last two sequel books by Brian Herbert will make no sense unless you read the Butlierisn Jihad prequel series first.  It also helps to read the three "House" prequel books as well.

Thanks - I better get reading them first then. I did wonder. But I was left hanging at the end of Chapterhouse...
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: Taalcon on February 12, 2020, 01:02:24 pm
I'm actually also in the middle of a re-read (via Audible) of the first Dune novel. Been a couple decades since I last visited it. I'm very much enjoying it. Probably going to be reading through the rest of the Herbert volumes as well (I've been warned against the BH/KJA additions, but I'm still curious). Getting quite excited for the new film coming out this year, either way.
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: Curelom on February 12, 2020, 04:15:09 pm
I'm reading The Mirage Factory by Gary Krist, subtitled Illusion, Imagination, and the Invention of Los Angeles.

It tells how Los Angeles was invented, which it indeed was. Los Angeles is not a “real” city. One mid-century historian called it "a collection of suburbs in search of a city." Much of its growth was not organic, tied to events in the world around it, like most typical cities.

The book focuses on three early trends (not really events, more like processes) that made a dusty patch of ground into one of America's metropolitan giants. Those were the vision of early city fathers for water grabs from rural areas with no political clout to fight back, the growth of the movie industry, aided by lots of land & mostly good weather, & the spiritual seeking of early 20th century Americans that led so many religious denominations & (OK to use the c-word) cults to either form or be attracted to settle there.

If you read a lot of Los Angeles or California history, you see that San Francisco owed much of its early development to its natural harbor, the Gold Rush, & the completion of the transcontinental railroad to Sacramento, a river port connected to S.F. Bay. OTOH, early Los Angeles was synthesized from a bunch of contrived "events."

Once the water came, land developers & speculators lured patsies from the East and Midwest who were sick of 5-month winters. They wove tales of grand cities – many would never exist, with wide boulevards where you could live in a mansion but still pick oranges from your own trees. While the movie makers didn’t always make pictures about Los Angeles, the industry drew tons of aspiring stars. L.A. as an illusion in the American mind grabbed such people’s imaginations as a place where anyone could escape the past & start a fresh new life. This fed an environment filled with newcomers who have cut their old roots & are adrift with none of the people, institutions, & traditions that defined who they used to be.

Sidebar: if anyone remembers the Dionne Warwick song, “Do You Know the Way to San Jose?” it is about just this kind of situation (except that today’s San Jose is not the San Jose that the protagonist of the song was pining for).

http://www.songlyrics.com/dionne-warwick/do-you-know-the-way-to-san-jose-lyrics/

In turn, that rootlessness fed religious crusaders who might be legit or not. Some of them wanted to save souls, while some are better described as religious entrepreneurs. The book focuses on Canadian-born Aimee Semple McPherson, who was raised in the Salvation Army tradition but became an evangelist in the mold of Pentecostalism, which started to take off in America around 1900. For years she traveled & preached in the U.S. & Canada, & for a short time in China with her first husband, who died there at a young age. She eventually landed in L.A. & formed the Foursquare Gospel Church. She was often linked to controversy & scandal, but the church she founded still exists & has a couple million members. I truly don’t know whether she was a crusader or an entrepreneur. My father in his younger days attended one of her churches, & it was for the same reasons as so many others: new in Los Angeles, didn't know anyone, a short-timer due to work & thus unlikely to grow any roots, & thought he’d drop into a church. It didn’t “take,” but if it had, I might not be here at Nauvoo today!

Anyway, lots of little tangents in this post. I’m a California kid & regional history fascinates me. It isn’t the kind of book that will change anyone’s life, but if you enjoy reading about social trends & what makes people & communities (or non-communities) tick, it’s an easy book to read & has a lot of interesting tidbits.

Other books I’ve recently read include Hillbilly Elegy by J.D. Vance & Nomadland by Jessica Bruder. These are about populations of “forgotten” or “left-behind” Americans, who haven't benefited much from educational opportunities & economic growth. for whom the “American dream” isn’t so shiny anymore. I may come back & talk about these books later.


(edited just to correct a typo)
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: CrowGirl on February 13, 2020, 01:13:10 am
Quote
I'm actually also in the middle of a re-read (via Audible) of the first Dune novel.

I just handed a paperback copy to CrowBaby, saying she should read it, and it will be unlike anything she’s read before.
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: Scruffydog on February 14, 2020, 03:09:28 am
I'm reading lots of PoW memoirs from WWII, but that's for work
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: JLM on February 15, 2020, 10:28:13 pm
So just finished "Mentats of Dune " I'm going to give the "Wheel of Time" series a try next.
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: mirkwood on February 16, 2020, 02:49:11 pm
I'm going to give the "Wheel of Time" series a try next.

Great series.  There are some weaknesses in the writing style, but you will see them and easily bypass them if you choose.
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: mirkwood on February 16, 2020, 02:49:47 pm
Finished The Empire Of Man series last night.  Starting The Last Jihad by Joel C. Rosenberg.
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: CrowGirl on February 17, 2020, 03:06:06 am
I read that one a while ago—enjoyed it.  Hope you do, too.
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: JLM on March 17, 2020, 11:47:52 pm
Finished "Eye of the World." Really enjoyed it.  Not too derivative of LOTR (except for the fact that it's a story about a group of young, simple folk, one of whom possesses "The One" power, embarking on an adventure to a forsaken land with an exiled warrior king and a magic wielder, and are pursued by monsters and riders on black, are forced to take some dangerous shortcuts, visit majestic cities and are skulked by a wretch who is compelled to seek "the one") but other than that, completely different from LOTR. 

Pacing was good.  Lots of room for further character development with multiple characters.  Well written action scenes.  Detailed but not overdone location descriptions. 

Biggest weakness was an over reliance on deus ex machina resolutions, disguised as "the turning of the wheel."  But, it's the first book in the series, so I'll assume the storytelling matures as the books progress.

On to book 2, "The Great Hunt."
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: Roper on December 23, 2020, 06:28:21 pm
I just finished "Goodbye, I Love You". I haven't read something so heartbreaking, beautiful, and hopeful in a long time. If anyone understands the relationship between sacrifice and love, it's Carol Lynn Pearson.
Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: Palmon on February 06, 2021, 11:28:20 am
I read this book back in October, the perfect season for a book about ghosts and hauntings. The author did a great job of creating Alfred Hitchcock's chills and suspense. It is one of this year's Whitney Award Finalists in the YA Speculative Genre.

Lifelike by Sheila Nielson

https://www.amazon.com/Lifelike-Sheila-Nielson-ebook/dp/B08L3Y4MC2 (https://www.amazon.com/Lifelike-Sheila-Nielson-ebook/dp/B08L3Y4MC2)

Title: Re: What are you reading?
Post by: Curelom on February 13, 2021, 12:47:10 am
The Black Death by John Hatcher, a story of the Great Plague of the 1340s in one English village. It reads like a historical account, but the people & events were created through the author’s research into Catholic Church records, village archives, & other records of the time, which he examined exhaustively to learn about the lives of ordinary people & everyday happenings.

We all know that for most of human existence, history was written from the viewpoint of those in power, so much of this story had to be created from scratch because almost everyone in the 14th century was illiterate. Priests, doctors, village clerks or other officials, & a scant few others who were literate had enormous power, & especially the clergy because people were generally very religious. Even those who lied, stole, fornicated, & were habitually idle or drunk would take care to say their confessions & be sure to obtain the last rites from the priests when their time came. Many priests also functioned as quasi-physicians, maybe because they could read & were able to learn from earlier scientific literature (there is a mention of one priest who had read the writings of the ancient Greek physician Galen). There was also a lot of superstition based on both Christian & pagan ideas.

The story is chronological, starting before the plague reaches England but with rumors about a mysterious pestilence that has swept though vast parts of Asia, the Levant (what we call the Middle East), & Europe. With near-universal illiteracy & limited travel by ordinary folk, it was hard for them to know how much was true in the tales of people sickening & dying within 3-4 days, the plague spreading from just looking at an infected person’s eyes, giant buboes that took over the body & turned it livid (hence the name “Black Plague”), corpses heaped up in the fields, etc. The main figures are the village priest, a devoted, tireless, humble servant, his assistants, & a few village families that we know by name along with some secondary characters. Many of these people were made up for the story for reasons mentioned. There are revealing insights on the feudal way of life, how the landless were at the mercy of the upper classes, & then the ways that the plague & the loss of half the population impacted feudalism.

I’m in the middle of it, so I don’t know everything that happens. But it seems that the peak of the plague in this village was for about two months, then it stopped.

I learned some new words that I had to look up in order to follow the story, including beadle, bede, villein, heriot, childwyte, "shrift, housel, & annealing," & I finally saw in print “brethren and sistren.” The author is a history professor at Cambridge, but the book was published in the U.S., uses American spelling, & doesn’t read the way you might expect a British author to write. I don’t know if this was a special U.S. edition, but it’s easy to read & interesting.

Next, I will read a positive book, because enough of plagues & pestilences. 😷  I think next will be either a collection of stories about living with wildlife in California (When Mountain Lions Are Neighbors) or maybe a novel of the California Gold Rush that I got awhile ago but never started. 
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